Tag: horses

The True Nature of Horses, Peace Loving or Formidable Killing Machines? 4

Kicking

By now, and if my readers have read the previous 3 articles in this series, it should be accepted that a horses defences are used in different ways, depending on the situation and environment. It is an over simplification for a bite to be a bite, or a strike just to be a strike. The force used, the intention and the meaning can vary greatly. Therefore kicking with the hind legs also has multiple purposes, and is not always used to deliberately inflict damage.

The Double Barrel

The double barrel is a term used to describe a manoeuvre in which both back hooves leave the ground simultaneously in an upward and outward motion. While all kicks can cause catastrophic injuries, the double barrel could be the most lethal.  Horses have several methods of kicking, yet this manoeuvre would be the most powerful of all of them. The rump of the horse is made up of several enormous deep and superficial muscle groups. These muscles can be utilised for both speed, and employing a kick while in motion i.e. cantering or galloping.  This is completed by first powering their upper body off the ground to gain height without compromising forward momentum. During the downward motion of the leap the horse raises his rump to kick out. It is a fluid motion which allows the horse to utilise his defences while still moving at speed. Also of course, the double barrel can also be performed while the horse is stationary.

Image – The Double Barrel

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Faux Double Barrel

This manoeuvre can also be performed to demonstrate a warning. In this motion both back legs are brought up but are not fully extended outwards, but with the hooves staying vertically below the hocks. This is a threat, and owners of domesticated horses should read this as the horse saying Go Away. This brings us back to the earlier point in that horses do not always kick or bite to deliberately inflict damage. Horses are quite capable of discerning the level of threat, and responding with the appropriate level of defence. In most cases when a human is kicked it’s because they have not read, or missed, or even ignored the previous warnings and signals the horse has given out, and leading up to a kick. Horses can also kick as a warning or even a reprimand, yet again, with no intention of causing harm. Mares often reprimand an exuberant foal with a non-damaging kick, horses also give field mates a ‘slap’ to move another horse away.

Image – Faux Double Barrel

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Unfortunately, humans are too feeble to withstand a warning kick, we break too easily. Of course there are cases where a horse has kicked a human to deliberately cause massive damage, but in some cases the horse is giving the human just a ‘slap’. Sadly the horse will be labelled as dangerous, and only because the human missed the signals. If anyone can survive a kick, then the horse never intended to kill that person in the first place, because if the intention was to kill…they would have been killed.

Single Barrel

This is probably the most usual form of kicking that people are aware of, and seen most often. The horse extends just one back leg, either with all three still on the ground, or as with the double barrel, lifting the hind-quarters off the ground but only extending one leg. Also, similar to the double barrel, this action can be performed either stationary or while in motion. Often favoured if the intended target is off to the side of the horses hind-quarters. While horses are agile enough to twist their back/pelvis to deliver a double barrel it’s unlikely the off side hoof will make contact due to the angle and position of the target. Quite often the double barrel is attempted but only one hoof hits the animal with the other hoof missing entirely, although this could also be intentional.

Cow Kick

This manoeuvre is performed by one back hoof moving up, and forward towards the belly, or off to the side. This can be used in defence but it’s also a very useful motion to remove anything irritating from the underneath of the horses body i.e. biting insects/flies and vegetation such as burs or cacti. Horses often cow kick when showing symptoms of colic  as the horse is aware something in that area is hurting him, so attempts to remove it. This is not an early sign of colic however, if the horse is cow-kicking in pain because of colic, then potentially it’s already in the late stages.

The Panic Kick

It is a manoeuvre and it is for defence, but technically this type of kick is more to do with instinctive reaction, than an intentionally well aimed kick at a specifically chosen target. Moreover this is another reason novices, children, dogs and non-horsey people get kicked. Horses can kick out of surprise, they can quite literally do it in their sleep, in fact, a dozing relaxed horse is more likely to kick if surprised. Alert horses are fully aware of their surrounding and environment, and have already identified what is a threat or not. So for example, if an owner suddenly drops a bucket behind a relaxed horse this could potentially trigger the kick instinct. Touching a horse that hasn’t seen/heard someone coming can again result in the animal kicking from surprise. Horses can kick out merely by someone or another horse running by, and especially behind them.

Image – Panic KickC

It’s likely the horse kicking out in this image is not doing so to inflict serious damage. It is either kicking out from surprise at the two horses running behind him, or he’s demonstrating disgruntlement at having his space invaded. There is but a narrow gap for the mare and foal to pass, but they do so anyway, and at their own risk. It could be that the foal has run ahead of mum, and she’s had no choice to also run past, in order to shield her foal from being kicked. It’s more likely however they both needed to pass this horse even with no room to spare so rushed through. I also know there is a water source nearby, and their intention was to reach it. Driven by this incentive, the danger of getting kicked is less than their need for water. Either way, the horse doing the kicking deliberately aims low, if this was full on aggression he could have, if chosen to, double barrelled the mare. Simply put, he’s punishing insubordinate behaviour with a slap, rather than intending to inflict serious injury.

Further reading;

Part 1

The true nature of horses, peace loving or formidable killing machines?

Part 2

The True Nature Of Horses, Peace Loving or Formidable Killing Machines? 2

Part 3

The True Nature of Horses, Peace Loving or Formidable Killing Machines? 3

Images – By kind permission of Gary Odell

Why Do Horses Jump Rider-less?

We have all seen the videos in which a rider falls while show-jumping, and the horse continues to jump the fences. Most of the comments will have a very positive outlook on such an event. Most people will agree it’s because the horse loves jumping and has been trained well. The more ignorant comments will suggest that the horse is attempting to finish the competition without the rider. Actually, a well-trained confident horse would stop jumping once the rider has fallen.

Continue reading “Why Do Horses Jump Rider-less?”

The Realistic Guide To Buying A Horse Part 4

#11 Buy a horse you already know

Many riders go on to become horse owners after sharing or loaning a horse. However I am not talking about loaning with a view to buy here, as that is something very different. But a rider that has been financially contributing to the upkeep of someone else’s horse for some time, without the sole intention of ever buying it. Usually however, it is common that when such an opportunity arises, the sharer advances into horse ownership. This would actually be the most recommended path to horse ownership in my humble opinion. The rider would already be aware of  the horse’s personality and level of training, experience and confidence. They should also (hopefully) understand the work and cost involved in the upkeep of the animal. Experience would have been gained in dealing with the farrier, dentist and vet, and of course the animals dietary and exercise needs.

Continue reading “The Realistic Guide To Buying A Horse Part 4”

The Realistic Guide To Buying A Horse Part 2

#5 Do not overlook the veteran horse

Do not be deterred from buying a horse that is over 12, 15, 18 or even 20 years old. If the animal is fit there is no reason why such an age should matter, or even be relevant. A 20 year old horse will hunt, show-jump, hack or even compete in dressage for example. Horse care has come on in leaps and bounds in the last couple of decades. They are afforded better dental, farrier and vet care, as well as improved feed and supplements, both of which can contain essential herbs and minerals to maintain good health. Most yards insist on fastidious worming programs, and flu and tetanus jabs. Manufacturers of equine consumables strive (and compete) to improve the quality of bedding in term of reducing dust and maximising absorption. Frankly put, there has never been a better time to be a horse, and 20 could be seen as the new 10!

Continue reading “The Realistic Guide To Buying A Horse Part 2”

The Realistic Guide To Buying A Horse Part 1

#1 Don’t be swayed by pretty names and good looks

My first horse was a 14.2 hh strawberry roan mare called Princess. 8 year old girls in particular will immediately want to own a pony that is strawberry roan, and called Princess. The child’s parents may also assume such a beautiful pony with an angelic, virtuous name would be appropriate for a little girl. As it turns out pretty ponies with pretty names are not as virtuous as 8 year old children think. Over a period of 2 years I had to endure bucks, rears and bolts and all the associated injuries and terrifying experiences that occurred during such events.

Continue reading “The Realistic Guide To Buying A Horse Part 1”

Grazing Muzzles Cause Misery

There appear to be various contraptions readily available to buy these days in which it seems evident that the designer of the product either had no love for horses, or was ignorant of their welfare. Moreover it appears the buyer of such contraptions willingly shares the same mindset of the manufacturer. There are a few things that cause me to grimace when I see a horse from afar. One is seeing a horse wearing a rug on a warm day, or just because it’s raining. The other is seeing a horse wearing a grazing muzzle.

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Why I Hate Spurs

I am just going to come out and say it. Spurs should only be used if you are a very, VERY good rider. If a rider does not have the skills, knowledge or patience to re-educate a horse with desensitised sides, which is why the majority of bad riders are using them, then spurs are the last thing they need. It is not my intention to become part of the no bits, no spurs, no anything brigade. Spurs may have their place in the equestrian world, and are traditionally used all over the planet, in my view, to refine the leg aid. An extremely well trained horse may for whatever reason ignore the leg, and I use the word ‘ignore’ loosely. There could be many reasons why the horse has not responded in that particular instance. So strapped to the leg of an expert, one that is aware of their own movements and know exactly what they are asking of the horse, then yes spurs have their place. But then compare that to someone that has been riding 3 years and are strapping spurs on because they are about to do a pre-novice dressage test, or jump 60 cm at the local show.

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The Livery Snob

…and she’s only a D.I.Y’er!

Yes I heard those words. That delightful sentence fell from the mouth of a person on full livery.

They had felt compelled for some reason, to log a complaint to the yard owner about a person on Do It Yourself livery. I can’t imagine what the naughty diy’er had done, perhaps it was even about me!

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Aggression Doesn’t Always Mean Dangerous

Over the years I have more than once, blamed a groom for forgetting to bolt the stable door when finding my horse loose on the yard. Then one day I witnessed my mare jumping out of her stable! Well that’s putting it more mildly than what really happened when my horse escaped. Continue reading “Aggression Doesn’t Always Mean Dangerous”

The Planned Spook

There is only one good reason why my terrier would suddenly go from lounging on the carpet to suddenly leaping up and running under the sofa at break neck speed. Being fully aware of the reason, the human sat on said sofa jumped up and ran fearfully to the living room door. For the past 20 years this particular arachnophobe has made sure to train her dogs to perform a very important duty. Terriers it would seem are far more talented in this role as opposed to larger dogs that struggle to successfully squeeze under sofas, armchairs or beds. 3 seconds later my pint sized tri-coloured saviour emerged with it caged between two rows of teeth, and it was enormous. I don’t like to see any living thing on this earth hurt, or unnecessarily killed, but my phobia runs deep. I would actually prefer to throw a pint glass at a spider rather than catch it humanely. I’m very sorry for this. Continue reading “The Planned Spook”